Documentation

Patch color definitions for Datacolor SpyderCheckr 48

Posted by on Oct 24, 2017 in Design, Documentation | 0 comments

Below you find the Datacolor SpyderCheckr 48 definition of patches in different color spaces, such as LAB, sRBG and AdobeRGB. Datacolor offers a lousy bitmap of the values which are difficult to read and impossible to use in a structured way. So there you go, a table of all the values that this color chart is suppose to represent:

Lab sRGB Adobe RGB
Number Patch Name L A B R G B R G B
1 1A Low Sat. Red 61.35 34.81 18.38 210 121 117 189 121 117
2 2A Low Sat. Yellow 75.5 5.84 50.42 216 179 90 205 178 96
3 3A Low Sat. Green 66.82 -25.1 23.47 127 175 120 141 174 122
4 4A Low Sat. Cyan 60.53 -22.6 -20.4 66 157 179 103 156 177
5 5A Low Sat. Blue 59.66 -2.03 -28.46 116 147 194 125 146 191
6 6A Low Sat. Magenta 59.15 30.83 -5.72 190 121 154 172 120 151
7 1B 10% Red Tint 82.68 5.03 3.02 218 203 201 213 202 200
8 2B 10% Green Tint 82.25 -2.42 3.78 203 205 196 202 204 195
9 3B 10% Blue Unit 82.29 2.2 -2.04 206 203 208 204 201 206
10 4B 90% Red Tone 24.89 4.43 0.78 66 57 58 66 60 60
11 5B 90% Green Tone 25.16 -3.88 2.13 54 61 56 59 63 59
12 6B 90% Blue Tone 26.13 2.61 -5.03 63 60 69 65 63 71
13 1C Lightest Skin 85.42 9.41 14.49 237 206 186 225 202 183
14 2C Lighter Skin 74.28 9.05 27.21 211 175 133 200 174 134
15 3C Moderate Skin 64.57 12.39 37.24 193 149 91 180 148 95
16 4C Medium Skin 44.49 17.23 26.24 139 93 61 127 93 65
17 SC Deep Skin 25.29 7.95 8.87 74 55 46 71 58 50
18 SC 95% Gray 22.67 2.11 -1.1 57 54 56 59 57 59
19 1D 5% Gray 92.72 1.89 2.76 241 233 229 238 233 229
20 2D 10% gray 88.85 1.59 2.27 229 222 220 226 221 219
21 3D 30% Gray 73.42 0.99 1.89 182 178 176 180 177 174
22 4D 50% Gray 57.15 0.57 1.19 139 136 135 137 135 134
23 5D 70% Gray 41.57 0.24 1.45 100 99 97 99 99 98
24 6D 90% Gray 25.65 1.24 0.05 63 61 62 65 63 64
25 1E Card White 96.04 2.16 2.6 249 242 238 247 242 237
26 2E 20% Gray 80.44 1.17 2.05 202 198 195 199 196 193
27 3E 40% Gray 65.52 0.69 1.86 161 157 154 158 156 153
28 4E 60% Gray 49.62 0.58 1.56 122 118 116 120 118 115
29 5E 80% Gray 33.55 0.35 1.4 80 80 78 81 81 79
30 6E Card Black 16.91 1.43 -0.81 43 41 43 46 46 47
31 1F Primary Cyan 47.12 -32.5 -28.75 0 127 159 39 126 157
32 2F Primary Magenta 50.49 53.45 -13.55 192 75 145 167 76 141
33 3F Primary Yellow 83.61 3.36 87.02 245 205 0 234 204 37
34 4F Primary Red 41.05 60.75 31.17 186 26 51 159 32 53
35 5F Primary Green 54.14 -40.8 34.75 57 146 64 94 145 71
36 6F Primary Blue 24.75 13.78 -49.48 25 55 135 41 58 132
37 1G Primary Orange 60.94 38.21 61.31 222 118 32 196 117 44
38 2G Blueprint 37.8 7.3 -43.04 99 86 96 70 89 156
39 3G Pink 49.81 48.5 15.76 195 79 95 170 80 94
40 4G Violet 28.88 19.36 -24.48 83 58 106 78 61 104
41 5G Apple Green 72.45 -23.6 60.47 157 188 54 165 186 69
42 6G Sunflower 71.65 23.74 72.28 236 158 25 218 157 46
43 1H Aqua 70.19 -31.9 1.98 98 187 166 130 186 166
44 2H Lavender 54.38 8.84 -25.71 126 125 174 125 124 171
45 3H Evergreen 42.03 -15.8 22.93 82 106 60 90 106 65
46 4H Steel Blue 48.82 -5.11 -23.08 87 120 155 98 119 152
47 SH Classic Light Skin 65.1 18.14 18.68 197 145 125 183 144 125
48 6H Classic Dark Skin 36.13 14.15 15.78 112 76 60 103 77 63
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Insta360 Plugin For Adobe Premiere and After Effects Is Not Working

Posted by on Sep 28, 2017 in Design, Documentation | 1 comment

I recently recorded a lecture I gave in Stuttgart using the latest Insta360 One camera. Since it is very difficult to stop an academic from talking the whole presentation took nearly one hour. The camera divided the recoding into several files, each around 4 GB. This is probably because they wanted to be compatible with the old FAT32 file system.

Their 360 Editing Software allows you to convert their proprietary  INSV files into MP4 files and they even have a batch processing option. But the software cannot merge multiple videos into one, which I desperately needed.

Insta360 is also offering a plugin for Adobe Premiere and After Effects. After installing the plugin I was able to import the INSV files into Premiere, but the image of one of the cameras was upside down. I contacted their technical support and they explained to me that the plugin is currently not working.

Insta360 Adobe Plugin failure

I ended up having to convert all the INSV files to MP4 first and then editing them into one movie in Premiere. I have to admit that this workflow is rather inconvenient and I hope that Insta360 will either enable their editing software to merge movies or that they get their Adobe plugin working again. This seems another example of Banana Technology, it ripens at the user.

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Affordable Sound Both for Voice Recording

Posted by on Sep 1, 2017 in Design, Documentation | 0 comments

Affordable Sound Both for Voice Recording

Recording a clear voice with no background noise is key for any video, audiobook or podcast. If you are limited in space and budget then you might consider building your own little sound proof voice recording box. I build this little gem from 6mm MDF and some acoustic foam taped to the box with double sided tape.

For the box you can create the drawing necessary for the laser cutter using online tools, such as Box Designer. It exports a PDF file which all the six faces clearly separated. If you are planning to make efficient use of your wood then you may prefer MakerCase. This service aligns the six sides so that they can be cut most efficiently from a piece of MDF. Here is the box drawing for laser cutter used for this design.

We attached rubber feed to the box and placed the microphone on an old mouse pad to isolate the microphone from any vibrations of the table, such as when a laptop is placed on it. Handles on the side allow for an easy transportation.

Here is a recording without the box. The microphone was placed just directly on the table:

This recording was made with the speaker sitting in front of the box speaking into the microphone.

The last example is with the speaker leaning into the box.

You will notice how all ambient noice is gone and how intimate the voice of the speaker sounds.

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Tutorial on how to install and setup JInput on Mac OS X using Eclipse

Posted by on Aug 14, 2017 in Documentation, Technology | 0 comments

Using mouse, keyboard, joysticks and other input devices in your Java software is much easier using JInput. Unfortunately, the documentation on how to install and setup the software is short and difficult to follow. I was struggling for days getting it to work with Eclipse on Mac OS X 10.12.6. My first approach was to use Maven to install JInput. The excellent M2Eclipse plugin provides good support for Maven. Unfortunately, the pre-configured Maven Repository does not include JInput. I was unable to configure Maven/Eclipse to connect to The Central Repository to download JInput from there. Okay, I am not a fulltime Jave programmer and maybe it would become clear to me eventually. In the meantime I got it to work manually. I hope that this tutorial will help you in your project. I used Mac OS X and I cannot guarantee it will work on any other platform.

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3D LEGO Technic Connector

Posted by on Jul 29, 2017 in Design, Documentation, LEGO | 0 comments

Connecting LEGO Technic beams in three dimensions remains a difficult task. While it has become easy to connect beams in one and two dimensions, it remains difficult to extend this to the third dimension.

I first designed a new LEGO Technic connector that features pins. The design was compact and stable, put the pins were too fragile. It was also very difficult to get the support material out from the holes.

My second design had no pins but still the option to firmly hold a technic beam. With this new 3D printed corner part it is possible to build a perfectly stable cube with a minimum of parts. The additional holes provide options for further strengthening the cube or to connect other parts to the cube.

The CAD model is available from Autodesk and GrabCAD.

 

 

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TicTacToe Playing LEGO Mindstorms Robot Using Computer Vision

Posted by on Jul 17, 2017 in Documentation, Featured, LEGO, Project | 3 comments

TicTacToe Playing LEGO Mindstorms Robot Using Computer Vision

You can play TicTacToe with this LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robot. It uses three motors to drop the balls into the right field. It uses a NXTCam to view the board and then calculates the best move using a MiniMax Algorithm. All future moves are explored an rated according to their winning chances. The work is based on the TicTacToe code of Thomas Kaffka. An IR sensor detects your hand when you drop your ball. The robot is using red balls and the human player uses blue balls. The Java code is available over at Github. The building instructions are available for LEGO Digital Designer. I used the MinuteBot baseplate, which is useful for building static Technic/Mindstorms models.

 

LDD does not have all the required pars in its database. You will have to replace 22961 with 27940. You will also need to add a worm wheel 27938. In addition you should use a lamp to provide consistent lighting. I used a USB powered LED circular lamp the can be powered through the USB port of the EV3. I only had to take out the lens in the middle so that the camera fits through the hole. A rubber band holds the light in place. To calibrate the robot I added a little arm at the end of the base plate against which the robot arm rotates. The position of the camera can be centered on the board using the wrench and through sliding along the axles.

You can also find information about the robot over at Rebrickable. The inventory there is correct and complete. Except for the base plate of course.

 

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