Featured

New Zealand Herald reports on our 3D printed robot project

Posted by on Aug 3, 2014 in Featured | 0 comments

New Zealand Herald reports on our 3D printed robot project

The New Zealand Herald reports today on our project to build a InMoov robot. This robot is open source hardware, meaning that all the blueprints and plans are available for download. You can send the files directly to your 3D printer and produce all the necessary parts yourself. Here is a time laps movie of the assembly of the head.

Read More

Topographical LEGO Map of Middle Earth

Posted by on Jul 16, 2014 in Design, Featured, LEGO | 1 comment

Topographical LEGO Map of Middle Earth

For the Christchurch Brick Show 2014 I build a Topographical LEGO Map of Middle Earth. I measures 2×2 meters and consists of 7 levels. It took approximately 30.000 bricks and four months to build the map. All the main characters of both books are presented on the map as minifigures. Even the path of the ring is illustrated through a breadcrumb style line of golden 1×1 round bricks. The map is accurate as much as a map of a fantastic land can be. I heavily consulted The Atlas of Middle-Earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad. This project was made possible through a strategic grant of LUG 4/2. I also created an album at Flickr for this MOC.

Read More

Spirograph Automaton made with LEGO Mindstorms EV3

Posted by on Apr 14, 2014 in Featured, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Spirograph Automaton made with LEGO Mindstorms EV3

This Spirograph Automaton is a LEGO drawing machine based on the the popular toy and the ideas of PG52. This version extends previous designs by using LEGO Mindstorms EV3. The Spirograph Automaton knows when the pattern is complete and lifts the pen at the right time. You no longer have to observe the machine to stop it when the drawing is complete. The gears are optimized to give fast results so that the children do not have to wait too long. I also build a coin detector that triggers the Spirograph Automaton.

The building instructions are available for very affordable price ($0.99). Please notice that the instructions do not include the three Mindsensors’ GlideWheel-AS sensors. They are not part of the LDD library. And neither is the part 14720 (Technic, Liftarm 3 X 5 Perpendicular H-Shape Thick) of which you will need two. You will also need four rubber bands, may it be from LEGO or otherwise. You can also consider using the Technic Changeover Plate (6631) for a better gear shifting experience. The complete parts list is available at ReRrickable.

The required software is available here. You need to run the program “calibrate” before running the program “draw”. Otherwise you will get a file reading error.

Read More

The Press reports on our colour study

Posted by on Dec 31, 2013 in Featured, Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Press reports on our colour study

The Press reports today on our study Semi-Automatic Color Analysis For Brand Logos. The article focuses on the national flag section of our paper. According to The Press, I am the acting director of the HIT Lab NZ! Oh well, at least they spelled my name correctly.

 

Read More

HRI promotion at University of Canterbury

Posted by on Sep 4, 2013 in Design, Featured | 0 comments

HRI promotion at University of Canterbury

The University of Canterbury is currently running a new campaign and we had the privilege of showcasing our work. The photo was taken at a professional studio and shows a typical human-robot interaction study setup.

 

Read More

Death by robot – who will be to blame?

Posted by on Jun 9, 2013 in Culture, Featured | 0 comments

Death by robot – who will be to blame?

We are currently systematically using tools to kill each other and even autonomous machines are a tried and tested method to kill humans, both soldiers and civilians. Land mines are maybe one of the best examples for such autonomous killing machines, although they are of course rather simple. But even the deterministic simplicity of killing machines can be their greatest asset. The Russians maintained an autonomous system during the cold war called the Dead Hand that, once activated, would automatically launch intercontinental missiles in case a nuclear attack on Russia was detected. Today’s weapon systems have become more complex, such as the Phalanx Gun System, which already caused the death of a soldier in 1989. Despite the increase of complexity the fundamental questions remain the same. Who will take the responsibility for a non-deterministic weapon system? And how do we define autonomy?

Interestingly, it is a requirement for a just war that the participating agents must be responsible for their actions. For an autonomous killing machine to fight a just war, we would need to give them the legal state of a person, so that it can take responsibility for its actions. But the ideas for a just war have fallen out of fashion. We no longer declare or end wars; we directly invade or attack from the air. Maybe the only glimpse of hope is that autonomous weapon systems, left to their own devices, will quickly run out of battery or fuel. Land mines remain a deadly threat long after the original conflict has ended.

This legal requirement of responsibility becomes even more pressing in a civilian context. We will need to make our autonomously driving cars legal persons so that it can be made responsible for the deaths they will cause. In the near future I am convinced that we will have to deal with more fatalities through autonomous cars than autonomous war machines. The first documented death by robot already occurred as early as 1979 when a factory worker was hit by a robotic arm.

It is also important to make a clear distinction between Science and Fiction. Many of the recent articles on “Killing Robot” used imagery from the movies “Terminator” to illustrate human like killing machines. Using a fiction to talk about real world problems is misleading at best. The autonomous weapon systems we will be dealing with in the near future come from the air, not the ground. The media is abusing the Frankenstein Complex to stir fears of androids. This may seriously harm the research and development of androids.

Isaac Asimov, a famous writer wrote: “Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent”. By that definition, autonomous killing machines are hopelessly incompetent, since all they know is violence. Lets remain competent in our decision.

Read More